Can A Vasectomy Cause Premature Ejaculation Issues?

man and doctor considering getting a vasectomy and the risks, including premature ejaculation

Vasectomy and Premature Ejaculation Issues

When a man chooses to undergo a vasectomy procedure, it’s often after a long period of thought and thorough medical consultation. There are lots of questions that you should ask your doctor, and you should make sure that before you complete the procedure, you feel confident you’ll get the results you want.

Does a vasectomy cause premature ejaculation issues? Thankfully, it does not! You should feel all the same sensations during sex that you did before the operation, and if you didn’t experience premature ejaculation before your vasectomy, there is no medical reason you would experience it afterward.

Why Do Men Choose to Get a Vasectomy?

A vasectomy offers a near–100% accurate, permanent method of birth control for heterosexual couples. It involves a simple trip to the doctor’s office, costs far less than a female sterilization procedure and is ultimately a lower-cost birth control option for a couple.

The surgery takes about 30 minutes, and involves a fairly straight-forward cutting and sealing the both of the vas deferens: the tubes that carry sperm from the testes to the urethra, where it is ejaculated in semen. The procedure is done with a local anesthetic, and the incisions are so small, that frequently stitches are not even required.

Watch an animation for a simple education on the procedure →

What Happens After a Vasectomy?

Like many surgeries, there is a small chance for infection, swelling, or even a little pain and discomfort after a vasectomy. A vasectomy is a relatively quick procedure, performed in a doctor’s office and not a hospital, and it’s considered low-risk for complications or side effects. You’ll need to take it easy for a few days and relax with a strategically placed ice pack.

And it won’t be 100% effective right away.

You’ll need to ejaculate as many as 15 to 20 times or wait up to three months before the sperm will be cleared from both of the vas deferens,” according to FamilyDoctor.org. Your doctor will check your ejaculate regularly for two to three months after the procedure. “Only after you have a sperm-free sample will you be considered unable to get a woman pregnant.”

It’s key to take this step with testing. Even after a long waiting period “men should still get [semen] tested — achievement of azoospermia (no sperm in ejaculate) can take up to a year,” notes Taylor Kubota at Men’s Journal.

Does Sex Feel the Same After a Vasectomy?

Yes! After a period of healing, and after a medical professional test your ejaculate and no longer detects any sperm in it, you will not be able to impregnate a woman. You will, however, still feel the same sensations during intercourse that you did before the operation.

Before your vasectomy, be open and honest with your doctor and urologist. If you came into the operation experiencing some premature ejaculation concerns, those may still exist post-surgery. A vasectomy is not a cure for PE because it does not affect the process of ejaculation, simply the material being ejaculated.

The parts of the body that are affected by the vasectomy procedure are the two vas deferens tubes, which carry sperm into the urethra but do not impact having or keeping an erection. Completing the procedure, however, has been shown in some recent studies to clear the path (so to speak) for an increase in sexual activity.

“In 2014, the Journal of Sexual Medicine published a study on the sexuality of 76 couples following a vasectomy,” notes the International Society for Sexual Medicine, based in the Netherlands. “Using an assessment tool called the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), researchers compared the men’s ability to have erections before and after surgery. They found that overall, the men’s average IIEF scores increased a little bit, with improvements in the erectile function, orgasmic function, and general sexual satisfaction domains. In general, ED was not a problem for men after vasectomy.”

A 2015 study by researchers at Stanford, noted that men who had undergone a vasectomy reported having sex more frequently than their non-vasectomized counterparts, possibly due to a decreased sense of anxiety over the possibility of pregnancy.

Whatever your ultimate choice is about having a vasectomy, it’s always best to talk to your doctor about any medical concerns before undergoing the procedure. It’s considered a permanent step in your life and should not be taken lightly.

Can A Vasectomy Cause Premature Ejaculation Issues?

Home - Resources - Premature Ejaculation - The Causes of Premature Ejaculation - Can A Vasectomy Cause Premature Ejaculation Issues?

man and doctor considering getting a vasectomy and the risks, including premature ejaculation

Vasectomy and Premature Ejaculation Issues

When a man chooses to undergo a vasectomy procedure, it’s often after a long period of thought and thorough medical consultation. There are lots of questions that you should ask your doctor, and you should make sure that before you complete the procedure, you feel confident you’ll get the results you want.

Does a vasectomy cause premature ejaculation issues? Thankfully, it does not! You should feel all the same sensations during sex that you did before the operation, and if you didn’t experience premature ejaculation before your vasectomy, there is no medical reason you would experience it afterward.

Why Do Men Choose to Get a Vasectomy?

A vasectomy offers a near–100% accurate, permanent method of birth control for heterosexual couples. It involves a simple trip to the doctor’s office, costs far less than a female sterilization procedure and is ultimately a lower-cost birth control option for a couple.

The surgery takes about 30 minutes, and involves a fairly straight-forward cutting and sealing the both of the vas deferens: the tubes that carry sperm from the testes to the urethra, where it is ejaculated in semen. The procedure is done with a local anesthetic, and the incisions are so small, that frequently stitches are not even required.

Watch an animation for a simple education on the procedure →

What Happens After a Vasectomy?

Like many surgeries, there is a small chance for infection, swelling, or even a little pain and discomfort after a vasectomy. A vasectomy is a relatively quick procedure, performed in a doctor’s office and not a hospital, and it’s considered low-risk for complications or side effects. You’ll need to take it easy for a few days and relax with a strategically placed ice pack.

And it won’t be 100% effective right away.

You’ll need to ejaculate as many as 15 to 20 times or wait up to three months before the sperm will be cleared from both of the vas deferens,” according to FamilyDoctor.org. Your doctor will check your ejaculate regularly for two to three months after the procedure. “Only after you have a sperm-free sample will you be considered unable to get a woman pregnant.”

It’s key to take this step with testing. Even after a long waiting period “men should still get [semen] tested — achievement of azoospermia (no sperm in ejaculate) can take up to a year,” notes Taylor Kubota at Men’s Journal.

Does Sex Feel the Same After a Vasectomy?

Yes! After a period of healing, and after a medical professional test your ejaculate and no longer detects any sperm in it, you will not be able to impregnate a woman. You will, however, still feel the same sensations during intercourse that you did before the operation.

Before your vasectomy, be open and honest with your doctor and urologist. If you came into the operation experiencing some premature ejaculation concerns, those may still exist post-surgery. A vasectomy is not a cure for PE because it does not affect the process of ejaculation, simply the material being ejaculated.

The parts of the body that are affected by the vasectomy procedure are the two vas deferens tubes, which carry sperm into the urethra but do not impact having or keeping an erection. Completing the procedure, however, has been shown in some recent studies to clear the path (so to speak) for an increase in sexual activity.

“In 2014, the Journal of Sexual Medicine published a study on the sexuality of 76 couples following a vasectomy,” notes the International Society for Sexual Medicine, based in the Netherlands. “Using an assessment tool called the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), researchers compared the men’s ability to have erections before and after surgery. They found that overall, the men’s average IIEF scores increased a little bit, with improvements in the erectile function, orgasmic function, and general sexual satisfaction domains. In general, ED was not a problem for men after vasectomy.”

A 2015 study by researchers at Stanford, noted that men who had undergone a vasectomy reported having sex more frequently than their non-vasectomized counterparts, possibly due to a decreased sense of anxiety over the possibility of pregnancy.

Whatever your ultimate choice is about having a vasectomy, it’s always best to talk to your doctor about any medical concerns before undergoing the procedure. It’s considered a permanent step in your life and should not be taken lightly.

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