Premature Ejaculation (Rapid Ejaculation)


Premature ejaculation is a medical condition that affects the penis and the entire male reproductive system.

Subtypes and Symptoms

First, it's important to define a commonly-used medical term for premature ejaculation - the Intravaginal Ejaculatory Latency Time (IELT). This the time from initial penetration to ejaculation. More simply, the length of time of sexual intercourse.

The symptoms of premature ejaculation are typically divided into four sub-types:

  • Lifelong Premature Ejaculation - which is characterized by having the symptoms during your entire sexual life and with a consistent IELT of approximately one minute or less
  • Acquired Premature Ejaculation - which is characterized by acquiring the symptoms later in your sexual life and an consistent IELT approximately three minutes or less
  • Variable Premature Ejaculation - which is characterized by symptoms of occasional IELT of approximately three minutes or less.
  • Subjective Premature Ejaculation - which is characterized by symptoms of normal IELT accompanied by sexual dissatisfaction with the length of time of sexual intercourse. 


Causes

Because of the complexity of the male reproductive system, the exact cause of premature ejaculation is not known. Although PE often decreases a man's sexual confidence and psychological therapy is often recommended, most physicians now believe that psychological issues are rarely a cause of PE. Rather, experts are now favoring neuro- biological causes of premature ejaculation. The most common causes cited by medical professionals and literature are high penile sensitivity, a serotonin deficiency in the brain and elevated oxytocin levels in the blood. There are several less common biological causes of PE which include hyperthyroidism and prostatitis 


Symptoms

First, it's important to define a commonly-used term for premature ejaculation - the "intravaginal ejaculatory latency time" or IELT. This the time from initial penetration to ejaculation. More simply, the length of time of sexual intercourse. The symptoms of premature ejaculation are typically divided into three categories:

  • IELT less than one minute - this is often referred to as "clinical" premature ejaculation and most often associated with lifelong PE.
  • IELT between one and three minutes

Both premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction result in the loss of an erection and is sometimes confused with premature ejaculation. However, with premature ejaculation, the loss of erection always occurs after ejaculation while with ED, loss of erection may occur at any time during sexual activity.


Treatment

Treatment of premature ejaculation often starts with behavioral therapy including the start / stop method and the squeeze method. Although men report that these methods can delay ejaculation, their overall sexual satisfaction does not improve significantly. For better results, men often turn to either a topical or an oral medication. The most common type of medication is a desensitizer in the form of a local anesthetic, and, for this application, often called a topical anesthetic.

These medications typical come in the form of a spray or cream and applied to the penis prior to sexual activity in order to desensitize the penis, enabling men to delay ejaculation. The most common anesthetic for PE topical medications is lidocaine although benzocaine and prilocaine are also used. Topical anesthetics have the possible side effect of diminished sexual pleasure for both the man and his partner. However, a new class of topical anesthetics with absorption technology greatly decrease these side effects.

Another common type of medications used for premature ejaculation antidepressants in the form of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) , which are oral drugs in which the side effect of the drug delays ejaculation. SSRIs often have numerous negative side effects including nausea, headaches and loss of libido.