Lifelong Vs. Acquired Premature Ejaculation

man sitting on edge of bed, asking himself what type of premature ejaculation he may be experiencing

The Differences Between Lifelong and Acquired Premature Ejaculation

The International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) defines premature ejaculation as such:

A male sexual dysfunction characterized by:

  • Ejaculation which always or nearly always occurs prior to or within about one minute of vaginal penetration from the first sexual experiences (lifelong PE), or, a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in latency time, often to about 3 minutes or less (acquired PE) The inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations

  • Negative personal consequences, such as distress, aggravation, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy.

There are two main types subtypes of PE: lifelong PE and acquired PE. The differences between lifelong vs. acquired premature ejaculation are simple — lifelong PE has been with you for your entire sex life; acquired PE occurs when you notice new irregularities in your ejaculation time.

If you’re experiencing this phenomenon, you’re not alone: Affecting nearly 30% of men all over the world, premature ejaculation is likely the most common sexual dysfunction for men.

Let’s look at some of the other differences between the two main types of PE.

Lifelong Premature Ejaculation

Lifelong premature ejaculation, which affects less than 5 percent of men, means you’ve always experienced short ejaculation times (60 seconds or less).

Some of the common characteristics among those with lifelong PE include psychological difficulties and sexual anxiety related to trauma experienced during development — from early sexual abuse to parents walking in during masturbation.

If you’ve experienced premature ejaculation for your entire sex life, consult a physician or urologist (if you haven’t already) to discuss your health history, get a formal diagnosis, and create a treatment plan.

Acquired Premature Ejaculation

Acquired premature ejaculation is defined as a sudden onset of faster ejaculation times after experiencing normal ejaculation for most of your sexually active life.

In studies of patients sharing this condition, acquired PE has been linked to erectile dysfunction, sexual performance anxiety, and psychotropic drug use.

Acquired PE is rare, so if you’re troubled by a pattern of premature ejaculation after an otherwise normal sexual history — and if over-the-counter products aren’t effective — consider calling your doctor or a urologist to determine whether an underlying physiological condition is to blame.

Beyond these clinical cases, there are two other types of premature ejaculation you should be aware of:

Variable Premature Ejaculation

Variable PE is simply an occasional occurrence of premature ejaculation. This is completely normal and can happen for a lot of reasons — perhaps you’re unusually excited by a new partner or surprising approach to foreplay, or it’s been a while since you last had sex.

Remember that humans don’t have an orgasm countdown timer — variations in your ejaculation time are to be expected. Over-the-counter products like Promescent are a perfect first line of defense against variable PE.

But if you begin to notice more dramatic changes to your ejaculation times — or variations that happen on a more regular basis — it may be time to speak with your doctor.

Promescent standard size bottle
Last Longer In Bed
Promescent's proprietary formula allows for quick absorption, so you (and your partner) can enjoy long-lasting intercourse.

 

Subjective Premature Ejaculation

Subjective premature ejaculation is often considered the most common form of this incredibly common sexual dysfunction. (Men are tough on themselves!) Although it’s normal for most men to ejaculate within five to seven minutes during sexual intercourse, many men with normal ejaculation times still believe they should be lasting longer than they do in an effort to satisfy their partners.

Why does this happen? Experts have dubbed this phenomenon the orgasm gap. In heterosexual relationships, this gap exists because the average time to orgasm for women is 17 minutes (from the point of penetration and thrusting). This discrepancy often leads to couples feeling disappointed in their sex lives and ability to feel satisfied in the bedroom.

young couple laying in bed facing away from each other upset from the outcomes of the orgasm gap
How To Beat The Orgasm Gap
Now you know it exists, learn to beat it. There are things you should know and the techniques you can use to help make sex more enjoyable for her— every time!

Should You See a Doctor?

If your inclination is to see a doctor, trust your gut.

It’s always best to see your doctor if you experience any sudden patterns of change in your sexual function. There may be underlying medical conditions responsible for changes that seem superficial — and sometimes these conditions can be treated before they escalate.

Make an appointment with your doctor or a urologist if you’ve recently experienced any of the following:

  • Premature ejaculation

  • Erectile dysfunction

  • Pain with ejaculation

  • Severe delay or inability to experience ejaculation or orgasm

 

Lifelong vs Acquired PE

man sitting on edge of bed, asking himself what type of premature ejaculation he may be experiencing

The Differences Between Lifelong and Acquired Premature Ejaculation

The International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) defines premature ejaculation as such:

A male sexual dysfunction characterized by:

  • Ejaculation which always or nearly always occurs prior to or within about one minute of vaginal penetration from the first sexual experiences (lifelong PE), or, a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in latency time, often to about 3 minutes or less (acquired PE) The inability to delay ejaculation on all or nearly all vaginal penetrations

  • Negative personal consequences, such as distress, aggravation, frustration and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy.

There are two main types subtypes of PE: lifelong PE and acquired PE. The differences between lifelong vs. acquired premature ejaculation are simple — lifelong PE has been with you for your entire sex life; acquired PE occurs when you notice new irregularities in your ejaculation time.

If you’re experiencing this phenomenon, you’re not alone: Affecting nearly 30% of men all over the world, premature ejaculation is likely the most common sexual dysfunction for men.

Let’s look at some of the other differences between the two main types of PE.

Lifelong Premature Ejaculation

Lifelong premature ejaculation, which affects less than 5 percent of men, means you’ve always experienced short ejaculation times (60 seconds or less).

Some of the common characteristics among those with lifelong PE include psychological difficulties and sexual anxiety related to trauma experienced during development — from early sexual abuse to parents walking in during masturbation.

If you’ve experienced premature ejaculation for your entire sex life, consult a physician or urologist (if you haven’t already) to discuss your health history, get a formal diagnosis, and create a treatment plan.

Acquired Premature Ejaculation

Acquired premature ejaculation is defined as a sudden onset of faster ejaculation times after experiencing normal ejaculation for most of your sexually active life.

In studies of patients sharing this condition, acquired PE has been linked to erectile dysfunction, sexual performance anxiety, and psychotropic drug use.

Acquired PE is rare, so if you’re troubled by a pattern of premature ejaculation after an otherwise normal sexual history — and if over-the-counter products aren’t effective — consider calling your doctor or a urologist to determine whether an underlying physiological condition is to blame.

Beyond these clinical cases, there are two other types of premature ejaculation you should be aware of:

Variable Premature Ejaculation

Variable PE is simply an occasional occurrence of premature ejaculation. This is completely normal and can happen for a lot of reasons — perhaps you’re unusually excited by a new partner or surprising approach to foreplay, or it’s been a while since you last had sex.

Remember that humans don’t have an orgasm countdown timer — variations in your ejaculation time are to be expected. Over-the-counter products like Promescent are a perfect first line of defense against variable PE.

But if you begin to notice more dramatic changes to your ejaculation times — or variations that happen on a more regular basis — it may be time to speak with your doctor.

Promescent standard size bottle
Last Longer In Bed
Promescent's proprietary formula allows for quick absorption, so you (and your partner) can enjoy long-lasting intercourse.

 

Subjective Premature Ejaculation

Subjective premature ejaculation is often considered the most common form of this incredibly common sexual dysfunction. (Men are tough on themselves!) Although it’s normal for most men to ejaculate within five to seven minutes during sexual intercourse, many men with normal ejaculation times still believe they should be lasting longer than they do in an effort to satisfy their partners.

Why does this happen? Experts have dubbed this phenomenon the orgasm gap. In heterosexual relationships, this gap exists because the average time to orgasm for women is 17 minutes (from the point of penetration and thrusting). This discrepancy often leads to couples feeling disappointed in their sex lives and ability to feel satisfied in the bedroom.

young couple laying in bed facing away from each other upset from the outcomes of the orgasm gap
How To Beat The Orgasm Gap
Now you know it exists, learn to beat it. There are things you should know and the techniques you can use to help make sex more enjoyable for her— every time!

Should You See a Doctor?

If your inclination is to see a doctor, trust your gut.

It’s always best to see your doctor if you experience any sudden patterns of change in your sexual function. There may be underlying medical conditions responsible for changes that seem superficial — and sometimes these conditions can be treated before they escalate.

Make an appointment with your doctor or a urologist if you’ve recently experienced any of the following:

  • Premature ejaculation

  • Erectile dysfunction

  • Pain with ejaculation

  • Severe delay or inability to experience ejaculation or orgasm

 

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