GAINSwave for ED

GAINSWave is an ED treatment that uses shockwave therapy to help restore bloodflow to the penis. Learn more about this procedure and whether it can work for you.

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky
Board Certified Urologist, expert in male sexual dysfunction
by Dr. Jed Kaminetsky Last updated 11/28/2022
gainswave for erectile dysfunction

Erectile dysfunction is a common problem for men, with nearly 18% of men suffering from it in the US.

However, finding the best treatment option is often highly individualized, and it can take a lot of trial and error.

Quick FAQs

GAINSWave is a procedure that uses shockwaves to restore bloodflow to the penis.

The low intensity shockwaves help remove plaque from the veins and regenerate tissue.

It generally takes months of treatment to start seeing results.

When more common treatments have failed, newer methods, such as GAINSWave therapy for ED, are often recommended.

While this procedure may sound unusual at first, GAINSWave is a promising new treatment that may be the perfect solution for some men.

First Things First: What is GAINSWave?

So what is GAINSWave for ED?

GAINSWave is a relatively new procedure in the US that uses low-intensity shock wave therapy to regenerate tissue within the penis and dislodge plaque from the veins to combat erectile dysfunction.

While shock wave therapy sounds intense, another clinical term is low-intensity sound wave therapy, which is closer to how the treatment is actually conducted.

The procedure consists of low-range vibrations that pulse through the desired area (in this case, the penis) to help stimulate new cell and nerve growth while also potentially removing harmful plaque from the penile veins.

According to GAINSWave, these harmful plaque deposits can contribute to ED by disrupting blood flow. 

After several GAINSWave treatments, the company claims that the removal of plaque will allow for fuller erections due to increased blood flow. 

Along with this, the regenerated tissue will help to promote new cell growth to ensure proper circulation throughout the penis.

Some other reported benefits from the company include:

  • A reduction in curvature or Peyronie's disease
  • Fuller and larger erections
  • A possible increase in sensation

The GAINSWave machine is relatively small and unobtrusive, and similar in size to a cellphone. 

During the procedure, the patient will have the machine held against the penis by a licensed professional, and it will be moved around accordingly for roughly 20-30 minutes.

How Does it Help with Erectile Dysfunction?

The theory behind the GAINSWave machine for ED is that penile tissue and veins begin to fill with micro plaques as a man ages. 

Over time, this plaque reduces blood flow and prevents new blood vessel growth leading to weaker erections.

To help, GAINSWave’s low-intensity shock therapy will pulse through penile tissue to help disrupt and remove the plaque. 

The company claims that this will allow increased blood flow and the regeneration of cells to promote fuller and stronger erections.

Does GAINSWave Work for ED?

It should be noted that the FDA does not currently approve GAINSWave’s procedure for erectile dysfunction.

However, there are some studies on the technology itself that show promising results for curing erectile dysfunction.

In a 2013 study, it was found that low-intensity shock wave therapy greatly increased erection quality in men suffering from ED without any apparent side effects.

In a more recent 2019 study, low-intensity shock wave therapy was shown to induce tissue regeneration and stronger erections during treatments for ED. 

No side effects were reported during this trial as well.

These adjacent studies show that GAINSWave's technology is likely to be beneficial for some men in their fight against ED.

Likewise, many GAINSWave reviews for ED are often positive, with men praising the nearly immediate results and long-term benefits.

Few of the testimonials are negative, and many claim that the therapy cured their ED completely.

However, since GAINSWave focuses on removing plaque and renewing cell growth, it may not help all men who suffer from ED, depending on the root cause. 

If a man is suffering from ED due to these conditions, then GAINSWave may help tremendously.

However, erectile dysfunction can appear due to a number of different reasons that GAINSWave may not help with.

Some other common reasons for ED include:

  • Low testosterone
  • Low or high blood pressure
  • Vitamin deficiencies
  • Stress or anxiety
  • Sexual insecurity
  • Trauma

In these situations, GAINSWave is unlikely to help if plaque is not the main cause of a man’s ED.

GAINSWave FAQs

How Long Does it Take to Work?

Each GAINSWave treatment is roughly 20-30 minutes long, and they usually recommend multiple treatments to ensure long-lasting results.

The exact number of treatments is individualized and dependent on factors such as:

  • How responsive they are to the procedure
  • The age of the patient
  • Any health complications
  • The severity of ED
  • Any related blood flow or circulatory issues

In most cases, men should expect at least several months of treatment, according to GAINSWave’s website.

How Much Does it Cost, and is it Covered by Insurance?

On average, the GAINSWave cost per treatment is $500 if purchased in a bundle. Individual treatments purchased outside of a plan are likely to be more expensive.

The full price and recommended treatment schedule are available only after a consultation with a GAINSWave representative or licensed provider.

Insurance is also unlikely to cover any GAINSWave treatment due to it being elective and not FDA-approved.

In most cases, any elective procedure to combat ED will be paid out of pocket.

Is it Painful?

Generally, low-intensity shock wave procedures are not considered painful.

Some men may experience rare side effects or soreness later, but the procedure itself is unlikely to be painful or distressing.

Are There Any Alternatives to GAINSWave Treatments?

There are other available alternatives to GAINSWave treatments that also provide effective results for many men.

Some of the readily available treatments for ED include:

  • Cialis
  • Viagra
  • P-Shot, or the Priapus Shot
  • Kegels
  • Supplementation such as vitamin D or VitaFLUX
  • Penile implants
  • Therapy

Can I do it Myself at Home?

No one should attempt any medical procedure or shock-wave therapy at home under any circumstances. 

This procedure should only be done by licensed providers to prevent serious injury.

Risks and Side Effects

While some studies have found few risks with the GAINSWave treatment for ED, some providers have warned of the potential for side effects that you should take note of before the procedure.

Some of these rare but notable side effects may include:

  • Bruising
  • Pooling of the blood
  • Painful erections
  • Worsening curvature of the penis
  • Soreness
  • Sensation changes
  • Infection

Takeaways

GAINSWave is a relatively new procedure that may provide benefits for men treating their erectile dysfunction, especially if the cause is from plaque buildup.

The cost and necessity for multiple visits make it a more complicated treatment option compared to medications or supplements

However, in situations where nothing else has worked, GAINSWave may prove to be beneficial. It’s also less invasive than other medical procedures such as penile implants or the P-Shot.

With several studies showing promising results, along with the relative safety of the procedure, GAINSWave is a promising treatment option for men with ED.

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky

Dr. Jed Kaminetsky M.D. is an American Board Certified Urologist and earned his Medical Degree at New York University. In his tenure he became a member of the American Urological Association and the American College of Surgeons. Dr. Kaminetsky pioneered the minimally invasive Rezum BPH treatment and is an expert in male and female dysfunction.

Sources:

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The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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