background Layer 1
Want To Get Better in Bed?
Yes, explore products. No, I think I'm good.

Your Cart is Empty

Perfectly Paired With

Sertraline for Premature Ejaculation: Is it Safe, Are There Alternatives?

Taking Zoloft for premature ejaculation is generally safe and effective, but there are some important things you should know.

Dr. Laurence Levine
Expert in male sexual health, leading Urologist in USA

by Dr. Laurence Levine Last updated 04/01/2022

Using Zoloft for premature ejaculation

Premature ejaculation is one of the most common forms of sexual dysfunction that men face, second only to erectile dysfunction.

And sometimes, the issue is problematic enough that medical treatment is required.

For some, that treatment may come in the form of sertraline (Zoloft), as it’s more commonly known.

By now, some of you may be thinking,"Wait, isn’t Zoloft used to treat things like depression and anxiety?"

And you would be right, but as it turns out, it can also help with premature ejaculation.

Quick FAQs

Zoloft increases the amount of serotonin in your brain by blocking its ability to perform the reuptake process. This increase in serotonin is believed to be what helps with premature ejaculation.

There are many great alternatives to sertraline. Some are even available over-the-counter, like Promescent Delay Spray.

Sertraline is generally considered safe and effective in the treatment of PE. However, it is a medication, and like with all medications, Zoloft comes with its own list of potential side effects.

No, but studies have shown that when taken daily, it is proven to be much more effective at controlling premature ejaculation. However, people in the on-demand camp experienced fewer side effects.

How Does sertraline help premature ejaculation?

Zoloft for enhanced orgasm control

Studies show that sertraline is effective for men with premature ejaculation.

Previous studies have shown that Zoloft prolongs intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT), but side effects are also common.

In 2006, a placebo-controlled study, published in the International Journal of Impotence Research, used a validated questionnaire to examine the effectiveness of sertraline hydrochloride for the treatment of premature ejaculation.

Around 81 percent of subjects experienced prolonged ejaculation time.

 NCBI Statics - 7.6 minute ejaculation time increase with sertraline

In another study, the men with an average ejaculation interval of around a minute experienced an ejaculatory interval increase to an average of 7.6 minutes with a 25mg dose of sertraline hydrochloride.

Higher doses appeared effective for delaying ejaculation even longer, but several men experienced adverse effects.

A modern-day approach for treating premature ejaculation with Zoloft is to take the medication on-demand or as-needed before sexual intercourse.

This helps to negate some of the adverse side effects like drowsiness and dizziness.

However, with this approach, those men did not enjoy as much control over their premature ejaculation when compared to the men taking daily doses.

Risks and side effects of Zoloft

Sertraline, like all SSRIs, comes with its own laundry list of side effects, and while most are mild, there are some more severe.

Some of the most common side effects include:

  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea
  • Tremors
  • Indigestion
  • Loss of appetite
  • Excessive sweating
  • Decreased sexual desire
  • Sexual dysfunction
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Insomnia
  • Dry Mouth
  • Fatigue
  • Agitation

While Zoloft is commonly prescribed for premature ejaculation, some men report experiencing problems with erectile dysfunction or an inability to reach a climax at all when taking Zoloft.

In the impotence research mentioned above (Int. J. Impot. Res. in 1998), 10 of the 46 participants experienced orgasm without ejaculation (anejaculation) at a 100mg dose level.

So, even though the medication works to enhance intravaginal ejaculatory latency time, some men can have even more troubling adverse effects.

Some side effects may be more apparent early in treatment and may subside with continued treatment.

Because selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can have some severe side effects to consider, you’ll have to decide if these risks are worth it for you personally when looking at this as a treatment option.

Suppose you are on an SSRI for mood disorders and have problems with sexual function.

In that case, it may be worth talking to your doctor about adding a libido-supporting supplement like VitaFLUX to your everyday regimen.

Zoloft compared to other methods to treat PE

So, you can treat premature ejaculation with sertraline hydrochloride, but there are other, safer methods out there for treating premature ejaculation.

Let’s have a look at some of them now.

Delay Sprays

Promescent delay spray for treating premature ejaculation

Delay sprays are an excellent option for helping to control premature ejaculation.

They are typically lidocaine or benzocaine-based sprays that help reduce sensitivity levels in the penis.

However, we should note that not all delay sprays are created equal.

Unlike other sprays on the market, Promescent Delay Spray has a unique patented formula that penetrates the skin, so, when used as directed, there is almost no chance of transferring it to your partner.

And research shows that Promescent increased the ejaculatory latency time to an average of 11.6 minutes compared to just 6.81 minutes for the group not using the product.

Pro Tip: Another great tool in the fight against premature ejaculation is Promescent Female Arousal Gel. Combined with our proven Delay Spray, you'll be able to extend your time while shortening hers.

Delay Wipes

Promescent delay wipes for premature ejaculation

Delay wipes are topical wipes that are pre-saturated with a benzocaine solution and used to treat PE.

Much like the spray, these benzocaine wipes can also help with premature ejaculation by lowering sensitivity levels in the penis.

Exercise

Kegel (pelvic floor) exercises can also be beneficial for treating premature ejaculation and benefit the overall sexual experience.

Kegel exercises for men help strengthen the muscles used to control ejaculation.

The belief is that strengthening the pelvic floor may give a man more control over ejaculatory latency.

Techniques

Below are a couple of proven behavioral techniques that have helped many people struggling with premature ejaculation.

How to use the start stop or edging method for controlling premature ejaculation

  1. Edging, for example, involves pinpointing the proverbial point of no return during sexual intercourse, stopping, waiting for the urge to pass, and then restarting.
  2. The squeeze technique may also help. Essentially, this method is a lot like edging, except when you stop sexual stimulation, you firmly squeeze on the penis for a short time until the urge to ejaculate subsides.

These two techniques can be highly effective when done correctly, but what’s even better is that you can use them alongside other options like delay spray or medications.

Important Takeaways

While SSRIs like Zoloft can effectively treat premature ejaculation, other options may be just as effective and not so associated with adverse effects.

For this reason, your doctor will likely consider selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as the final option for treating premature ejaculation.

Medication is not generally the best route when there are only occasional problems.

Topical products like Promescent delay spray or wipes are highly effective in delaying ejaculation, and many men find these products greatly enhance sexual satisfaction for themselves and their partners.

Related Articles

Dr. Laurence Levine
Dr. Laurence Levine

​Dr Laurence Levine is a Professor of Urology and practices at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. He is focused specifically on Male Sexual Health and is past President of the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA). Dr. Levine graduated from the University of Colorado School of Medicine where he received his MD and completed his training in Urology at the Harvard Program in Boston.​

Sources:

Absorption Pharmaceuticals LLC (Promescent) has strict informational citing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic or research institutions, medical associations, and medical experts. We attempt to use primary sources and refrain from using tertiary references and only citing trustworthy sources. Each article is reviewed, written, and updated by Medical Professionals or authoritative Experts in a specific, related field of practice. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

  • Yi, Zhan-Miao PhD, Chen, Shi-Di MS, Tang, Qi-Yu MS, Tang, Hui-Lin MS, Zhai, Suo-Di BS. (2019 June). Efficacy and safety of sertraline for the treatment of premature ejaculation. Medicine. https://journals.lww.com/md-journal/fulltext/2019/06070/efficacy_and_safety_of_sertraline_for_the.72.aspx. Accessed March 24, 2022.
  • M Arafa & R Shamloul. (2006 March, 23). Efficacy of sertraline hydrochloride in treatment of premature ejaculation: a placebo-controlled study using a validated questionnaire. Nature. https://www.nature.com/articles/3901469. Accessed March 24, 2022.
  • C G McMahon. (1998 September). Treatment of premature ejaculation with sertraline hydrochloride. National Library of Medicine. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/9788108/. Accessed March 24, 2022.
  • Soheila Siroosbakht, Sadra Rezakhaniha, Bijan Rezakhaniha. (2021 April). Comparative study of on-demand and daily use of sertraline in treatment of premature ejaculation: A randomized clinical trial. ScienceDirect. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214388219301018. Accessed March 24, 2022.
  • K P Mark1, and I Kerner. (2016 August, 25). Event-level impact of Promescent on quality of sexual experience in men with subjective premature ejaculation. National Library of Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5399162/. Accessed March 24, 2022.
  • The College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists. (2016 January). Sertraline (Zoloft). National Alliance on Mental Illness. https://www.nami.org/About-Mental-Illness/Treatments/Mental-Health-Medications/Types-of-Medication/Sertraline-(Zoloft). Accessed March 24, 2022.

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.


English