How Can I Help My Partner With Erectile Dysfunction?

The Promescent Team
Hands on, practical experience – this is our expertise
by The Promescent Team Last updated 01/17/2023
how to help your partner with erectile dysfunction

If you’ve asked yourself, “How can I help my partner with erectile dysfunction?”, you’re not alone. With 18 million men dealing with ED, there are potentially 18 million partners dealing with it as well.

It’s important to let men with ED know that it's not a big deal. While it's more common as someone gets older, it can affect individuals of any age.

Quick FAQs

Focus on relaxing your partner by engaging in other forms of pleasure such as oral sex or using sex toys.

A relationship can survive erectile dysfunction as sexual function is restored through different treatment options.

Men can satisfy their partners through foreplay or oral sex and still provide them a satisfying sexual experience.

It's vital that significant others work with their partners and help develop solutions for the best sexual health and wellness.

How can I help my partner with erectile dysfunction

ED can have adverse effects on a relationship. It's imperative to support and encourage one’s partner to manage the condition together. Here are a few ways someone can help their partner with erectile dysfunction.

1. Talk about it

Communication is part of any healthy relationship. But, when it comes to erectile dysfunction, it’s necessary to find the right time to address it.

The place and time need to be neutral and non-sexual. Ideal scenarios to talk about it can include: 

  • While out on a walk 
  • Over a cup of tea
  • During a meal

Clear lines of communication also provide insight into how to please one another without intercourse. Make sure the partner doesn’t feel like there’s any pressure on them to perform.

2. Reassure your partner

Significant others need to reassure their partner that ED does not reflect who they are or their masculinity. They need to know that the feelings haven’t changed and that you'll work with them to find a solution.

Keep in mind that you're affected by your partner's ED, too. Talk honestly and stay optimistic about potential treatments and techniques to make sex more mutually enjoyable.

3. Research the condition

The helping partner should take time to do some research on their own. The more both partners know, the better discussions that can be had to decide on for ED treatments and lifestyle changes.

4. Help them find treatment options.

An underlying physical condition can cause erectile dysfunction.

  • Heart disease
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Certain prescription medications
  • Alcoholism and substance abuse
  • Sleep disorders
  • Low testosterone

Sometimes, a doctor will prescribe ED medication such as Viagra and Cialis. It takes time for pills to work, and they may not work all the time or as intended.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medications like VitaFLUX® are available that can increase erectile functions, boost circulation, and maintain a healthy testosterone level.

Be patient. The causes of erectile dysfunction can be physical, emotional, or psychological. It often takes time to find the best treatment.

Treating erectile dysfunction may require experimenting with different treatments, such as therapy and assistive devices.

5. Consider counseling

Some men benefit from cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) as a treatment for ED. It helps individuals address and change their thought processes, control their emotions, and alter their behaviors.

Stress, low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and guilt can all contribute to erectile dysfunction.

6. Offer to go to the doctor with them.

While some men prefer to go to a doctor alone, offering to join them can be a great way to provide support. Visiting a medical professional can keep significant others updated on potential erectile dysfunction treatments.

Doctors will run tests to check for any underlying conditions that could cause ED so that they can prescribe the proper treatment. Those treatments may include:

  • Medication: Viagra and Cialis are the two most prevalent oral medications for erectile dysfunction.
  • Vacuum devices: The tube goes over the penis and seals at the base. The pump then pulls the blood into the penis. Once erect, a ring is applied to the bottom to keep the blood in place.
  • Injectables: Some doctors will recommend injectables because they don't require stimulation to take effect.
  • Surgery: As a last resort, penile implants are a discreet way to manage erectile dysfunction because they're surgically implanted.

7. Encourage lifestyle changes

Poor heart and vascular health can lead to erectile dysfunction. Promote diet changes and come up with exercise plans together. Just taking a five-minute daily walk is a great place to start.

  • Stop smoking. Cigarettes contain nicotine which decreases blood flow to the penis by reducing the release of nitric oxide. The harmful ingredient nicotine can also cause impotence.
  • Limit or eliminate marijuana use. According to research, marijuana can lower sex drive and may increase the risk of erectile dysfunction.
  • Drug use. Illicit drug users experience sexual dysfunction at a higher rate.
  • Alcohol. Those that drink regularly or excessively have an increased likelihood of ED. Many men experience short-term erectile dysfunction if they drink too much before sex.
  • Destress. Couples should find ways to relax and enjoy one another's company so there’s less anxiety about sex, and a better chance for erections to occur.
  • Eat healthily. Individuals that are obese or overweight are at a greater risk of erectile dysfunction.

8. Engage in other sexual activity

As mentioned earlier, sometimes ED can get triggered by pressure to perform intercourse. Find other ways to enjoy one another sexually that are satisfying.

Oral sex, intense foreplay, watching porn, and coming up with fun and exciting sex acts that don't require intercourse are ways to maintain intimacy.

9. Engage in self-care

Significant others should find a trusted friend, family member, or therapist with whom they feel comfortable talking to.

It's not unusual for a partner of someone with ED to experience lowered self-esteem and body image issues. Significant others should remember that their partner’s dysfunction is not their fault.

Partners can practice self-care by cooking together, gardening, or taking regular evening walks.

Takeaways

Figuring out how to help a partner dealing with ED isn't always easy. It's important for couples to engage in an open and honest discussion about the issue.

By talking about ED, significant others are providing support to their partners in finding the proper treatment for them.

Treatments may include prescribed or OTC medication, sex assistive devices, surgery, or dietary changes.

Remember that orgasm is not the most important part of intimacy. Partners can still enjoy sexual activities by adjusting their lifestyle and adjusting what they do in the bedroom

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The Promescent Team

The Promescent Team

فريقنا لديه بأكثر من عشر سنوات من الخبرة في مجال الصحة الجنسية وهم خبراء في الاضطرابات الجنسية، مثل سرعة القذف. نحن نساعد الأزواج والأفراد على فهم أفضل لخيارات العلاج المتاحة لأنواع مختلفة من الاحتياجات الجنسية وتثقيف الجمهور بشأن كل الأشياء المتعلقة بالعلاقة الحميمة. نراجع كل المحتوى المكتوب لدينا طبيًّا للتأكد من دقته وموثوقيته.

Sources:

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The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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