Benzocaine Vs Lidocaine for Premature Ejaculation

Is Benzocaine or Lidocaine better for premature ejaculation? Find out how the two compare to decide which PE product is best for you.

Dr. Rachel Rubin
Expert in male sexual health, leading Urologist in USA
by Dr. Rachel Rubin Last updated 11/14/2022
benzocaine vs lidocaine premature ejaculation

Store-bought products can make a life-changing difference for men who struggle to delay orgasm. 

Delay wipes and delay spray are both effective options for premature ejaculation (PE).

However, questions usually arise about whether benzocaine or lidocaine—the two primary active ingredients in topical PE products—is better for PE.

Quick FAQs

Premature Ejaculation is when a man ejaculates too early for self or partner satisfaction during sex.

Both ingredients soak into the skin and lower sensitivity through the temporary disruption of nerve signals

Other oral medications such as SSRIs, exercise, and behavioral techniques may also help treat premature ejaculation.

So, should you go with wipes made with benzocaine vs. lidocaine spray?

Does one type of ingredient work better?

Here's a closer look at lidocaine vs. benzocaine, as well as a few other alternative treatments for PE.

What Is Premature Ejaculation?

According to the American Urological Association (AUA), PE is defined simply as ejaculating too early or too early for self or partner satisfaction during sex.

Males face three primary types of sexual dysfunction:

  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Ejaculatory dysfunction
  • Lacking sexual interest

PE is considered a sexual dysfunction, and it is one of the most common sexual function disorders among men. 

Among men between 18 and 59, 1 in 3 have problems with PE.

A common assumption is PE can only be diagnosed if ejaculation occurs before a certain span of time. 

It is true that a lot of professionals claim that ejaculation within one minute constitutes PE.

The true determining factor can have more to do with one’s personal feelings about when ejaculation should occur.

Premature ejaculation can have a number of underlying contributing factors, such as:

  • Low serotonin levels in the brain
  • Psychological issues, such as sexual repression, sexual performance anxiety, stress, guilt, or even relationship problems
  • Excessive penile sensitivity
  • Issues with hormones that affect sexual function

PE can be mild, moderate, or severe and can also be primary (has always occurred with sex) or secondary (the problem began later in life).

How Does Lidocaine vs. Benzocaine for PE Help?

In reality, both lidocaine and benzocaine have similar actions, and both can possibly help with PE.

Medical professionals rely on both local anesthetic agents to lower sensitivity levels during certain procedures.

For example, a dentist may use a Benzocaine-based gel to desensitize the gums before using a needle. 

Likewise, a lidocaine-based cream may be prescribed to help with a burn. As for benzocaine vs. lidocaine for PE, both have similar actions.

They soak into the skin and lower sensitivity levels in the penis by temporarily disrupting nerve signals.

The keys to achieving the best outcome with products like مناديل التأخير المبللة with benzocaine and Promescent Delay Spray with lidocaine include:

  • Proper timing - Give the active ingredient long enough to take effect.
  • Proper application - Make sure the product is applied to the right areas of the penis, such as the glans (head) and possibly the frenulum.
  • Proper dosage - Apply the proper amount of product to sensitive areas.

Benzocaine

Benzocaine is a well-established local anesthetic that is primarily used to lessen pain short term. 

Products made with benzocaine for PE include:

  • مناديل التأخير المبللة
  • Creams
  • الواقيات

In formal studies, benzocaine wipes have been shown to help men with PE.

In fact, Intravaginal ejaculatory latency times (IELT) increased from an average of just over a minute to closer to two minutes when using the wipes.

Lidocaine

Lidocaine has been in use since the 1940s in medicine and is effective for decreasing sensitivity when applied topically to different areas of the body, including the penis. 

PE products made with lidocaine include desensitizing sprays like Promescent Delay Spray, and certain types of premature ejaculation condoms.

In clinical trials, lidocaine-based sprays have been shown to be highly effective in delaying ejaculation. 

Men were able to increase their IELT times from a 6.81-minute average to just over 11 minutes when using the spray.

Benzocaine vs Lidocaine Duration

While both anesthetics have similar effects, lidocaine is stronger at lower concentrations, possibly as much as ten times stronger than benzocaine. 

This means the effects of lidocaine may also last longer than benzocaine, but individual experiences can vary.

As the aforementioned studies show, lidocaine seems to offer better results than benzocaine in terms of time until ejaculation. 

This is why a lot of men prefer lidocaine vs. benzocaine condoms or lidocaine vs. benzocaine sprays.

Research shows lidocaine takes effect in just a few minutes, but optimal effects are observed at about 35 to 40 minutes after application. 

By contrast, benzocaine starts to kick in quickly (around a minute or two) and is effective for around 5 to 10 minutes. 

Because benzocaine acts faster, It is often the go-to for burns or other skin injuries. 

However, lidocaine offers more long-lasting effects that may be more suitable for problems with PE.

Alternative PE Treatments

While benzocaine vs. lidocaine for numbing is something to consider as PE treatment, other options can be effective.

Oral Medication

A few different types of prescription medication may be recommended for premature ejaculation treatment.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which are typically prescribed for depression, may be prescribed off-label for PE.

While the mechanism of action of these medications balances serotonin levels in the brain, they are also known to slow ejaculation in some individuals.

Medications used for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), such as Viagra or Cialis, may also be prescribed to help with PE. 

In some cases, ED is related to PE, especially in older men.

Exercise

Some studies suggest that men who are more active are less likely to have problems with PE than those who lead a mostly sedentary lifestyle.

In one study, a group of over 200 men was divided depending on whether they were regularly physically active or mostly sedentary. 

Both groups were assessed for intravaginal ejaculatory latency time (IELT). 

Men in the group that was regularly physically active had significantly higher IELTs than the men who did not get a lot of exercises.

Certain types of exercise may be especially beneficial for PE.

For example, kegel exercises, also known as pelvic floor strengthening, are thought to help men gain more control over ejaculation during sex.

Behavioral Techniques

Certain behavioral techniques may help with prolonging orgasm and ejaculation during sex.

For example, edging (the start-stop method) is done by having sex until there’s an urge to orgasm but then stopping until that sensation or urge dissipates.

Then, sex resumes, and the process can be repeated.

Alternatively, some men benefit from the squeeze technique. It is a form of edging, except you squeeze the head of the penis firmly for several seconds to eliminate the urge to ejaculate.

Risk and Side Effects of Benzocaine vs. Lidocaine for PE

All local anesthetics can come with a low chance of side effects, including benzocaine and lidocaine. 

However, side effects are relatively rare with both ingredients as long as products are used as directed.

Benzocaine

Most people use benzocaine with no significant adverse reactions.

However, general side effects of topical benzocaine include:

  • Skin irritation, such as stinging, burning, or redness
  • Swelling of the application site or slight warmth
  • Blistering or flaking skin

Benzocaine can also cause an allergic reaction in some people, which may include symptoms like hives, swelling of the mouth or face, and difficulty breathing.

It should be noted that benzocaine may be slightly more likely to cause an allergic reaction than lidocaine.

Over-desensitization is also a risk when using benzocaine for PE.

However, if this occurs, simply wash off the product, and the sensitivity levels should return to normal soon after.

In the event of an adverse reaction, discontinue use, and seek medical attention for signs of an allergic reaction.

Lidocaine

Much like benzocaine, lidocaine can also lead to side effects, even though most users will never have a negative experience. Side effects of lidocaine can include:

  • Skin irritation, such as redness, stinging or burning
  • Itching at the application site
  • Cracked, flaky, or dry skin

Over-desensitization with lidocaine is a bit more possible than with benzocaine. If over-desensitization occurs, wash off the product and wait for sensitivity levels to return to normal.

Lidocaine vs. Benzocaine - Which one is right for you?

To determine the best product to use, consider the following questions:

  • Do you have a history of allergies to either lidocaine or benzocaine?
  • Are you looking for rapid onset of effects or a longer duration?
  • Do you prefer a certain type of product over another (e.g., spray vs. wipes)

Takeaway

Premature ejaculation impedes sexual satisfaction, but over-the-counter topical products made with benzocaine and lidocaine can help delay ejaculation.

When it comes to benzocaine vs. lidocaine for delay of ejaculation, both ingredients can be effective. 

Both lidocaine and benzocaine are considered safe, and most men don't experience side effects, but side effects are possible. 

Further, benzocaine may be more likely to cause an allergic reaction than lidocaine.

If neither local anesthetic is suitable, there are other options for PE treatment, including medications, exercise, and behavioral options.

If you’re looking to enhance your sex life with proven strategies and products, find out more information and take a look at sexual support products from Promescent.

Dr. Rachel Rubin

Dr. Rachel Rubin

Dr. Rachel S. Rubin is a board-certified Urologist with fellowship training in sexual medicine. She is an assistant clinical professor in Urology at Georgetown University and practices at IntimMedicine Specialists in Washington DC. Dr. Rubin provides comprehensive sexual medicine care to all genders. She treats issues such as pelvic pain, menopause, erectile dysfunction, and low libido. Dr. Rubin is currently the education chair for the International Society for the Study of Women’s Sexual Health (ISSWSH) and an associate editor for the journal Sexual Medicine Reviews. Dr. Rubin has fellowship designation from both ISSWSH and the Sexual Medicine Society of North America (SMSNA).

Sources:

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